Maya Fashion

I took the van from Santa Maria Poniente back to Carrillo on Saturday, and I've been organizing my data from the field work in that ejido over at the OEPF* office. At lunch today, I checked out "Moda Maya," a clothing and crafts store set up by OEPF to sell products made in the Ejidos.

Among their wares are some really cool wood carvings, mixing ancient Mayan themes with modern cutting techniques and imagery, and also a lot of traditional embroidery work. The embroidery, worn mostly by older Maya women at this point, is at great risk of becoming extinct, so its heartening to see traditional embroidery used on more modern "sexy" designs.

I feel like a lot of this stuff would do quite well in the US, and hope to bring some of it in one day. Check it out and tell me what you think:




Woodblocks and Jewelry Boxes



"The Ancient"


Some of this handmade embroidery is really intricate, and I think there is a bit of competition among traditional Maya women to see who can do the most elaborate and colorful designs.



A Mayan take on a western classic, the little blue dress.


Doña Eunice Be Chuc, who runs the shop, and me.

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*OEPF stands for "Organicacion de Ejidos Productores Forestales", which is the community owned forestry group I've been working with in Quintana Roo. Their website is a work in progress but can be found here: http://oepf.blogspot.com/

3 comments:

Dorothy said...

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Arqta. Marianela Porraz Castillo said...

hello
Im interested in the shop where you found out this clothing. Im trying to do a project of fashion design with people of some mayan comunities, and I found by accident your blog. Are u guys working in Calakmul! must be great living there for a while. My mail is marianelaporraz@gmail.com, am an architect, and I live in Merida.
Thanks!

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Excellent work, Maya Fashion is so cool, I saw all the photos and I really like the job! Congratulations, you will have success in everything!